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Feb232015

DBO Automatic Effectiveness Date Extension; and Quasi-Franchise Business Models

Franchise 101

bkurtz@lewitthackman.com
dgurnick@lewitthackman.com
tgrinblat@lewitthackman.com
gwintner@lewitthackman.com
swolf@lewitthackman.com

February 2015

 

Franchise Times Legal Eagles 2015

Tal Grinblat, Certified Specialist in Franchise and Distribution Law and Chair of the Franchise Law Committee of the Business Law Section of the State Bar of California, has once again been selected as one of the best attorneys in franchising by the Franchise Times. The full list of honorees will be published in the magazine's April edition.

IFA 2015

Barry Kurtz, David Gurnick and Tal Grinblat attended the International Franchise Association's annual convention, held in Las Vegas. The event provided an opportunity to participate in roundtable discussions and learn about the latest business and operational challenges franchisors and franchisees face in today's ever-evolving market.

E-Filing Gaining Momentum

As of January 1, 2015, the Department of Business Oversight (DBO) is authorized to accept multiple types of electronic filings under several laws it administers. The Commissioner may now prescribe circumstances under which the DBO accepts electronic records or electronic signatures. This progression suggests that California may be inching closer toward a universal electronic filing system.

 

FRANCHISOR 101: California Increases Time for Automatic Effectiveness from 15 to 30 Business Days


Automatic Franchise Effectiveness Date 

A new California law has given the California Department of Business Oversight, the State's regulator of franchises, more time to review franchise registration and renewal applications, with the result that franchisors, their accountants and their attorneys must work harder and faster to update their franchise disclosure documents, prepare their year-end audited financial statements and submit their applications to renew and maintain their franchise registrations.

The law amends the automatic effectiveness statutes in the Corporations Code (Sections 31116 and 31121) to increase, from 15 to 30 business days, the length of time that the Commissioner of Business Oversight has to review franchise applications and franchise renewals under the Franchise Investment Law. The revised statute provides that registration of an offer of franchises automatically becomes effective at 12 o'clock noon, California time, on the 30th business day after the filing of a complete application for registration.

A complete application is defined as one that includes the appropriate filing fee, Uniform Franchise Disclosure Document, and all additional exhibits, including audited financial statements for the franchisor's prior fiscal year, in conformity with regulations of the Commissioner.

Because most franchisors operate under a January to December fiscal year, franchisors and their accountants should keep the timing requirements of the new law in mind since they will have to file their complete applications early in March to take advantage of the automatic effectiveness statute.

 

FRANCHISEE 101: Is It a Franchise?


Accidental and Quasi-Franchises

Franchise 101 Lawyers*Certified Specialist in Franchise & Distribution Law, per the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization

For decades, non-franchise businesses have tried using a quasi-franchise business model (i.e., any business format license) to distinguish themselves from franchisors to avoid onerous franchise investment laws. A recent federal decision from California serves as an important reminder that it doesn't pay to skirt franchise registration requirements when a business arrangement meets the threshold requirements of a franchise.

In Chicago Male Medical Clinic v. Ultimate Management, Inc., a federal district court in Los Angeles ruled that a consulting agreement between a Chicago medical clinic and a management company amounted to the sale of a franchise under Illinois law.

The parties stipulated to the following facts: the clinic and the franchisor entered into a consulting agreement, giving the franchisee: 

  1. the right to use the National Male Medical Clinic trademark;

  2. a suggested marketing plan;

  3. access to the franchisor's expertise and knowledge in advertising and marketing certain medical services; and

  4. call center services.

Pursuant to the agreement, the franchisee paid an initial fee of $300,000, over $56,000 in royalties, and call center fees of over $45,000. The franchisee filed suit, alleging fraud for failure to follow disclosure requirements under the Illinois Franchise Disclosure Act ("IFDA").

Finding that the management company violated the IFDA by failing to register with the Illinois Attorney General's Office and failing to deliver a disclosure document, the court entered judgment in favor of the medical clinic, awarding the return of the initial $300,000 investment, and over $56,000 in royalties paid, plus costs and attorney fees.

Franchise laws are written in broad terms and are designed to protect franchisees. So licensors in business arrangements that fit the criteria of a franchise can wind up paying heavily on the back end if they dodge the franchise registration process.

Click: Chicago Male Medical Clinic, LLC v. Ultimate Management, Inc. et al., DC Cal. for further information.
 
 

This communication published by Lewitt Hackman is intended as general information and may not be relied upon as legal advice, which can only be given by a lawyer based upon all the relevant facts and circumstances of a particular situation. Copyright Lewitt Hackman 2015. All Rights Reserved.

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