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Entries in notice to employees (3)

Friday
Jun092017

Los Angeles Ensures Employees Know Their Rights. Employers, Take Notice.

Employment Defense

 

by Amy I. Huberman

818-907-3014

 

 

 

If Los Angeles was a person rather than a city, you could practically hear her telling employers, “It’s ON.

Minimum Wage Notice Los AngelesThe warning comes by way of a massive ad campaign to remind members of the working public they have certain rights regarding minimum wage and paid sick time – just in case employers fail to comply with these legal mandates. Witness the latest bus stop ads for example, in big, bold lettering, which sends a not-so-subtle reminder to Los Angeles workers. This one is right outside our offices on Ventura Boulevard in Encino:

In case you can’t read the graphics on the bus stop wall, here’s what it comes down to: As of July 1, 2017 which is less than a month away, ALL employers with workers in Los Angeles will need to increase wages. 

For employers with 25 or fewer employees, that means raising minimum hourly pay to $10.50 per hour. For companies with 26 or more employees, minimum hourly rates will increase to $12.00 per hour.

The chart below illustrates the scheduled increases through 2021 – after 2021, minimum hourly wage rates will be based on Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners, according to the Los Angeles Ordinance. 

Los Angeles Minimum Wage & Sick Pay

48 Hours Paid Sick  Leave in Los Angeles

Employees who perform at least two hours of work in a particular week in the City of Los Angeles are entitled to a greater amount of paid sick leave than California law mandates, pursuant to the City of Los Angeles Paid Sick Leave ordinance. These employees must be provided with one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked, or 48 hours each year. Larger companies (26+ employees) should have begun compliance last July. This July 1st, the rules apply to employers with 25 or fewer employees as well.

Ban the Box Penalties

The Fair Chance Initiative for Hiring Ordinance (FCIHO, a/k/a Los Angeles’ “Ban the Box” initiative) has been in effect since January 22nd of this year. This means that employers may not inquire about a job candidate’s criminal history until AFTER an initial offer of employment has been made.

There are strict rules regarding the “Fair Chance Process” and withdrawing job offers, should a criminal history be discovered.  Employers should proceed with caution. Go to Hiring and Firing in Los Angeles: Fair Chance Initiative Update, for more information.

Starting July 1st of this year, fines will  be imposed on employers who violate the rules According to the city’s Administrative Fine Schedule, they amount to $500 for the first violation, $1,000 for the second, and $2,000 for the third and subsequent violations.

These are the current rules specific to employers in Los Angeles, or employers headquartered elsewhere but have employees performing work within Los Angeles. Other cities (San Francisco comes to mind) may have stricter regulations.

Employers should follow a general rule of thumb: local laws tend to be stricter than county ordinances, which tend to be stricter than California regulations, and state regs tend to trump federal law. That isn’t always the case of course. But employers should always follow the higher standard.

Amy I. Huberman is an Employment Defense Attorney.

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

Monday
Oct242016

Employer Guide for Election Season

 

by Nicole Kamm & Tal Burnovski Yeyni

 

The 2016 presidential election season has provided fodder for often impassioned conversations among friends, family and co-workers.  While we may not always agree with all points of view, it is important to remember that conduct and discussion tolerated among friends or family may not be suitable in the workplace.

Employers should be mindful of the principal “dos and don’ts” when addressing political speech in the workplace

  • Do not encourage or discipline employees for their political activities.  California law prohibits employers from adopting or enforcing any policy that tends to control or direct employees’ political activities or affiliations. Employers further cannot coerce or influence employees to follow, or refrain from following, any particular line of political activity by threatening a loss of employment. Labor Code §§ 1101-1102.  

  • If heated discussions are an issue, remind employees about what constitutes acceptable conduct in the workplace.  Remind employees that all perspectives are entitled to respect, and that use of derogatory or abusive language will not be tolerated in a workplace setting.   

  • Comply with “time off to vote” rules in California. California law allows employees to take paid time off to vote (up to two hours) if employees do not have sufficient time outside of work hours to do so. Note, employees are allowed to take more than two hours to vote, but only two hours need be paid. 

Generally, time off to vote can be restricted to the beginning or end of an employee’s shift, whichever allows the most free time for voting and the least time off from the regular working shift (unless employee and employer agree otherwise). Finally, if employees know, or have reason to believe that time off to vote will be necessary, they are required to give notice to the employer at least two working days prior to the election.   

  • Post “time off to vote” notices. If not already in place (many pre-printed workplace postings reference time off to vote), employers must post an employee notice at least 10 days before a state-wide election – either in the workplace or where it can easily be seen by employees as they enter or exit their place of work. You can find a list of upcoming elections here, and sample notices here.   

 

Nicole Kamm and Tal Burnovski Yeyni are Employment Defense attorneys

 

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

 

Wednesday
Jun112014

Employers: Ready for California's Minimum Wage Increase?

Lawyer for EmployerWage and Hour Defense

 

by Nicole Kamm
818.907.3235

 

 

 

Last September, Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 10 into law, beginning a series of increases in minimum wages for California workers. The first increases under AB 10 is about to go into effect.

On July 1, 2104, the minimum wage in California will increase from $8.00 to $9.00 per hour.  This wage hike will have a wide-ranging impact on all California employers. 

For example:  

  • Non-exempt employees paid less than $9.00 per hour must receive an increase in pay.

  • Certain exempt employees (executive, administrative, professional) must receive a monthly salary of at least twice minimum wage on a salaried basis (as well as meet other exemption requirements).  Effective July 1, 2014, the minimum monthly salary for exempt employees increases to $3,120.  Employees paid less will no longer meet the exemption.

  • Inside sales employees under Wage Orders 4 and 7 must earn more than 1½ times minimum wage for all hours worked (they must also receive more than 50 percent of their compensation from commissions).  As of July 1, 2014, to qualify as exempt, such employees must be paid at least $13.50 per hour. 

The revised California Minimum Wage Official Notice should be posted next to your IWC Wage Order and other required workplace postings. 

Since 2012, California employers have been required to provide written notice to non-exempt employees containing certain information, including rate of pay.  The DLSE form Notice to Employee can be used for this purpose. 

Employers who have already issued this wage notice do not have to reissue as a result of the minimum wage increase provided the new wage rate is shown on the employee’s pay stub (itemized wage statement) with the next payment of wages.

Now is a good time for employers to audit their pay practices to ensure compliance with wage and hour laws.  If you have questions or need assistance with an audit, please contact me.

 

Other Minimum Wage Hikes

Minimum wages in California vary by city or county.If you're doing business in the Bay Area, be aware that the Richmond City Council voted to increase wages for workers in that city to $13.00 per hour by 2018 for most employers – higher than the current minimum wage in San Francisco ($10.74/hr).  Minimum wage in San Jose is currently $10.15 per hour.

This one isn't mandated by law yet, but employers should take note the California Senate recently approved a different set of increases, set to go before the Assembly. These proposed increases, if approved, would raise minimum wage to $11.00 per hour in January 2015, $12.00 in 2016, and $13.00 in 2017.

Already in place, Assembly Bill 10 will increase wages again to $10.00 per hour on January 1, 2016. 

 

Nicole Kamm is an Employment Defense Attorney at our firm. Contact her directly: 818.907.3235; nkamm@lewitthackman.com.

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

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