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Entries in estate tax (4)

Thursday
Nov302017

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: Trust & Estate Planning Considerations

Gift Tax, Trusts & Estate Planning Attorney

 

by Kira S. Masteller
818.907.3244

 

 

This week was supposed to be the week Republicans passed a tax bill. It’s unclear what exactly will happen in the immediate future, or if we’ll have to wait for the New Year to see any type of tax reform. If or when we do get tax reform, the new law under the current Administration will be called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Income Tax Reform 2017So how will this affect estate planning?

If either the U.S. Senate or House manage to pass their respective bills (both branches of Congress will need to sign off on one, cohesive plan), we could see big changes in the future.

Here’s a look at how potential tax reforms could affect individuals and married couples under each Congressional proposal.

 

Regarding Income Taxes

 

a.) Tax Brackets

HOUSE: Raises individual tax rates, but cuts tax brackets from seven to four. The new brackets would be changed to 12, 25, 35 and 39.6 percent.

SENATE: Keeps the current seven individual tax brackets, but lowers the rates for some of these. The revised rates will be 10 (same as current), 12, 22, 24, 32, 35 (same as current) and 38.5 percent.

b.) Standard Deductions

HOUSE & SENATE: The House and the Senate envision raising the standard deduction from the current $6,350 (single)/$12,700 (married) to $12,000/$24,000. One difference between the proposals is for the Head of Household deduction, currently capped at $9,500. The House plan raises this amount to $18,300, while the Senate plan raises it to $18,000.

c.) AMT

HOUSE & SENATE: Each chamber decided to repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax, which basically ensures the wealthier filers pay a minimum amount of tax no matter how many deductions they take.

d.) SALT

HOUSE: House Representatives plan to repeal the State and Local Tax Deduction (specifically income and sales tax deductions), and sets a cap on property tax deductions at $10,000.

SENATE: The Senate’s plan aims for a full repeal of this deduction.

e.) Pass-through Income

HOUSE: Income “passing through” sole proprietorships, partnerships, S-Corporations, etc., and currently taxed at individual income tax rates, will be taxed at 9 percent on the first $75,000 earned, and capped at 25 percent maximum. The current maximum rate is 39.6 percent. Certain personal service providers (law, accounting, brokerages, performing arts, etc.) would not be eligible for the lowered rates under this plan.

SENATE: In contrast, the Senate plan offers a 17.5 percent deduction rather than a lowered tax rate.

f.) Child Tax Credit

HOUSE: The Representatives’ plan raises this credit to $1,600, plus a $300 credit for each parent and dependent who is NOT a child. The child tax credit goes away for married couples making $230,000 or more per year.

SENATE: The credits are slightly higher at $2,000, plus a $500 credit for each dependent child. It is phased out for married couples earning $500,000 or more annually.

 

Regarding Estate Tax

 

HOUSE & SENATE: Currently, there is a 40 percent tax levied on assets valued at over $5.49 million, per individual. Both the branches of Congress would double the basic exclusion. However, the House of Representatives included plans to repeal the tax after 2024, while the Senate will not repeal estate taxes.

 

Regarding Charitable Gifts Tax

 

HOUSE & SENATE: Certain tax reforms such as the significant rise in standard deductions and a possible repeal of estate taxes, could have negative consequences for nonprofits. If more taxpayers choose the standard deduction rather than itemizing their returns for example, there will be less incentive to give to charity.

 

We anticipate there will be considerable “chopping” to both proposals with a compromise that leaves us with most of the proposed items for individuals intact, but potentially revised timelines for repeal rules. Stay tuned, as we will summarize the final reform tax bill when passed.

Kira S. Masteller is a Shareholder in our Trusts & Estate Planning Practice Group. 

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

Thursday
Jul312014

Tax Implications: Selling Your Home

Gift Tax AttorneyEstate Tax Minimization

 

by Kira S. Masteller
818.907.3244

 

 

If you've lived at a property for at least two out of the five years before you sell your home, you can consider that property your primary residence or "main home", per the Internal Revenue Service.

The IRS will then figure in the selling price, amount realized, and the adjusted basis (net cost after depreciation deductions and capital expenditures) to determine your gains or losses on the sale.

Special circumstances may qualify you for a partial exclusion if you don't meet ownership/residence tests.

 

Tax Benefits for Selling Your Primary Residence

If you have gained, the profits from the home's sale are generally excluded from tax for up to $500K for married couples filing joint returns and $250K for individuals. There are tests to qualify for this exclusion: 

  1. Primary Residence Ownership: You had to have owned the home for at least two of the last five years.

  2. Use as a Primary Residence: You had to have lived at the property for a 24 month period in the five years prior to the date of sale.

  3. Prior Exclusions: You qualify so long as you did not use the $500K/$250K exclusion within the last 24 months. In other words, you can keep employing these exclusions for selling a series of primary residences every two years.

  4. Married Couples: At least one spouse must qualify for the exclusion, and both spouses must have used the property as a primary residence as outlined above. 

Special circumstances like divorce, change of health or certain unforeseen events may help you qualify for a partial exclusion, if you do not meet the 24 month ownership or residence tests.

You may also be able to extend the exclusions to a second home, if you convert it to a primary residence before selling, though the laws governing this practice have severely limited property owners from doing this since 2008. Still, you may be able to exclude 10 percent of the your gains when selling second or vacation homes.

 

Home Sales and Tax Obligations

The remainder of your profits (on sales after January 1, 2013) may be subject to the Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT), at a rate of 3.8 percent, dependent on factors like the seller's net investment income. The NIIT affects individuals as well as most trusts and estates.

First time home buyer credits may need to be repaid when you sell, depending on when you purchased the property.

Previously, you may have postponed tax obligations on home sales by using the proceeds to buy another primary residence – deferring what you owed the IRS under what was called rollover rules. The law changed in 1997, and rollover rules will no longer apply.

 

Other IRS Considerations

You must report any gains that exceed the exclusion amounts above, though we recommend you report all real property sales anyway. If you received Form 1099-S, report it.

Kira S. Masteller is a Trusts & Estate Planning Attorney at our firm. Contact her via email: kmasteller@lewitthackman.com, or by phone: 818.907.3244.

 

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

Monday
Jul082013

Tony Soprano's Run In With the Tax Man

 

by Robert A. Hull

 

Many of us who were fans of the HBO show about a fictional New Jersey mafia family, The Sopranos, and actor James Gandolfini in particular (who played mob boss Tony Soprano), were shocked and saddened to learn of the actor's untimely death.  

Now, the media reports that substantial taxes will be due on Mr. Gandolfini's estate due to poor estate planning. Could some of these taxes have been avoided or, at the very least, delayed with different estate planning strategies?  

Based on the latest information about his estate, it is very likely. While many of the specifics are unclear, it appears Mr. Gandolfini could have benefitted from using estate planning strategies to leave more of his assets to his family.

As one example, if the $7 million life insurance payout to James' son was not held in a life insurance trust, the full value of this payout would be included in the value of his estate for taxation purposes. If such insurance were held in a life insurance trust, then this payout would not be included in his taxable estate, and could result in savings of several millions of dollars in estate tax.

Also, Mr. Gandolfini could have potentially reduced the size of his estate subject to estate taxes also by using revocable and irrevocable trusts, perhaps creating certain business entities and employing gifting strategies. But, without additional specific information about his assets, it is difficult to tell which combination would have been most effective.

Though the value of most of our estates does not approach Mr. Gandolfini's, estimated at over $70 million, we all have an interest in maximizing the assets which are ultimately distributed to our beneficiaries and minimizing those to the Tax Man.

The government's take from Mr. Gandolfini's estate will likely be over $30 million, and that's a lotta "scharole".

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.
Wednesday
May152013

A Living Trust – One of Many Tools for Protecting Your Estate

Trusts & Estate Planning Attorney

by Kira S. Masteller
818.907.3244

 

A living trust is not the only vehicle that individuals need to consider when completing an estate plan. There are several other types of trusts and tools, some of which are equally as important as a living trust, necessary to accomplish and complete planning goals.

A well rounded estate plan must also consider potential income tax problems, estate and generation skipping transfer tax consequences, as well as planning trusts for minor children or protecting a child’s inheritance from his or her spouse or creditors.

In the first of a six part series on Gift Tax and Estate Planning blogs, I'll explore how Living Trusts can help protect and secure you and your family members for the future.

 

What is a Living Trust?

 

A living trust is a way of holding title to your assets so they will not be subject to Court Conservatorship or Probate Proceedings during your life or upon your death.

The trust governs what happens to your assets if you are incapacitated during your lifetime, as well as providing for the distribution of your assets when you die. You can change your living trust while you are living and you keep control of the assets you place in the trust.

Estate for Federal Estate Tax purposes includes:

A living trust also includes estate tax planning provisions so that your family will not pay estate tax unnecessarily.

Estate taxes are presently at a 40 percent rate (of the value of all of your assets when you die). Your assets include your:

  • Real Estate
  • Personal Property
  • Business Interests  (Partnerships, LLCs, Corporations, Joint Ventures)
  • Money
  • Promissory Notes
  • Deeds of Trust
  • Investment Accounts
  • Retirement Plans (such as IRAs and 401(k) plans)
  • Life Insurance
  • Annuities

If the total value of these assets exceeds $5,250,000 (Federal Estate Tax Exemption in 2013), there will be an estate tax when you die on the amount in excess of the exemption at the rate of 40 percent.

While leaving your assets to your spouse avoids the estate tax at your death, it compounds the estate tax at his or her death. Therefore, it is not always the best strategy to leave all your assets directly to your spouse in joint tenancy or payable upon death accounts.

Instead, there are ways of allowing your spouse to have control over the assets, while still avoiding death taxes on those assets upon his or her death.  A living trust will generally provide estate tax planning provisions for a married couple by allocating the deceased spouse’s estate tax exemption to an Exemption Trust upon his or her death, so that his or her estate tax exemption will be fully utilized, thereby reducing the value of the surviving spouse’s estate upon his or her death.

Though a living trust is a very important and basic estate and tax planning tool, it is not the only one.  My next blog in this series will discuss Life Insurance, and how you can use that vehicle in conjunction with an irrevocable trust.

 

Kira S. Masteller is a Gift Tax & Estate Planning Attorney in our Trusts and Estate Planning Practice Group. Contact her for more information via email: kmasteller@lewitthackman.com.

 

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.

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