Employer Responsibilities re Mental Health Conditions
Thursday, December 29, 2016 at 10:32AM
Admin in EEOC, Employment Defense, General Business, Sue M. Bendavid, Tal Burnovski Yeyni, disability, discrimination claims, hiring and firing, reasonable accommodations
Wage and Hour Defense Attorney

 

by Sue M. Bendavid & Tal Burnovski Yeyni

 

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently issued a “User-Friendly Document” explaining the rights of job applicants and employees with mental health conditions. In doing so, the EEOC has confirmed that individuals with such conditions are protected from discrimination and harassment.

Employment Law Mental Health Disability

As noted, employers cannot fire, deny a job, deny a promotion or force an employee to take leave because of a mental health condition (there are exceptions when employees pose a “direct threat” to safety or cannot perform their jobs). The guidelines remind employers of the obligation to provide reasonable accommodations that would enable employees perform their jobs.

In our work advising and counseling employers, we often encounter employers who struggle with how to properly respond to disabled employees.

Whether it is an employee’s injury, mental health condition or stress, employers face confusion as to their legal obligations. Since failure to communicate and/or accommodate may sometimes result in costly litigation, we are providing a few basic guidelines to assist employers when facing similar issues.

Do not discriminate against employees with a mental or physical health condition:

Employers do not have to hire or retain employees in jobs they cannot perform, or employ people who pose a “direct threat” to safety (based on objective evidence, not merely myths and stereotypes). However, firing an employee or rejecting an applicant with a disability (whether physical or mental) is prohibited, unless the employee or applicant cannot perform the job with reasonable accommodation.

For example: Jane notified her employer she was depressed and needed two weeks off. Her employer believed depression was not a “real disease” and rejected Jane’s request without further discussion. When Jane failed to show up because of her condition, her employer fired her for unpermitted absence.

The employer’s actions in this scenario were potentially unlawful. When Jane gave notice of her mental condition and asked for accommodations in the form of time off, her employer was required to engage in an “interactive dialogue” (explained below) rather than rejecting her request for time off and then terminating her employment.

Even if you don’t believe an employee’s health condition and request for accommodation are legitimate, you must at least engage in an interactive dialogue. Under some circumstances (e.g., if the need for an accommodation is not obvious), you can ask the employee to provide reasonable medical documentation to confirm the existence of the disability and the need for reasonable accommodation.

Timely engage in “interactive dialogue” with the employee, even if the employee does not “officially” ask for accommodations:

This can be tricky. Under California law, an employer is required to initiate the interactive process when: (1) the employee requests an accommodation; or (2) the employer otherwise becomes aware of the need for an accommodation through a third party or by observation.

For example: Robert was cleaning a window when he fell off a ladder and hurt his hand. Emily, Robert’s supervisor, witnessed the incident. The next day, Robert came back to work with bandages on his hand. Robert never asked for an accommodation but was struggling with his usual manual tasks. As Robert never asked for an accommodation, Emily assumed Robert did not require one.

Emily assumed wrong. Since Emily witnessed the incident and saw Robert’s bandages she was on notice regarding his possible need for accommodations. Even if Robert did not need accommodations, it was Emily’s duty, as the employer, to engage in the interactive process with Robert to determine whether accommodations could be provided.

Even if the employee is not eligible for protected time off under the Family Medical Leave Act or California Family Rights Act, consider time off as reasonable accommodation:

Family and medical leave laws generally cover employers with 50 or more employees. However, even if you are not a covered employer, you may be large enough and must consider whether protected time off can be provided as a reasonable accommodation (See also 2 CCR 11065(p)(2)(M)).

Don’t rely on the undue hardship defense:

Generally, employers are not required to accommodate a disabled employee or applicant if the accommodation would cause an “undue hardship” to the employer. The term “undue hardship” generally means an accommodation that is unduly costly, extensive or substantial, or that would fundamentally alter the nature of the business’s operation. (See definition and factors to consider in 2 CCR 2 11065(r))

However, employers are advised to use the “undue hardship” defense narrowly and only when the accommodations might place extensive financial burden or would prevent the ongoing operation of the business. Further, employers should engage in the interactive dialogue before concluding an undue hardship exists.

For example, an applicant with a severe vision impairment applies for employment with a small market that has only four other employees. The applicant requires assistance to work the register by having another employee present at all times. The business in question would not have to provide the accommodation if, for example, it could not afford the cost of the additional staff or could not afford the cost of remodeling to accommodate two employees at the same time. (From California Department of Fair Employment Housing guidelines).

Keep an employee’s mental or physical health condition confidential:

Medical information that employers obtain regarding the medical or mental conditions or history of an employee or applicant must be maintained in separate medical files and kept confidential. The employee’s medical information may be discussed only under the following circumstances:

1. Supervisors and managers may be informed of restriction(s) on the work or duties of employees with disabilities and necessary reasonable accommodations; and

2. First aid and safety personnel may be informed, where appropriate, that the condition may require emergency treatment; and

3. Government officials investigating compliance are to be provided relevant information on request. (See 2 CCR 11069(g))

Document, Document, Document:

We cannot emphasize this enough. A little documentation can go a long way.

When you meet with an employee as part of the interactive process, prepare a written summary of the meeting and indicate the reasonable accommodation options discussed. If you decide to grant the employee’s request, document that as well. If you deny the employee’s request because of undue hardship, put that in writing and explain the reasons for the denial. You should invite the individual to further engage in the interactive process and keep the door open to other options. In fact, any change in accommodations should be in writing.

Bottom line:

A little communication and documentation can go a long way and prevent costly litigation. Don’t rely on stereotypes or your personal knowledge and beliefs when an employee requests accommodations or gives notice of medical or psychological conditions. Meet with the employee, discuss his/her restrictions and discuss possible accommodations, if necessary.

As always, if you have questions or concerns regarding your obligations as an employer, contact an attorney in our Employment Practice Group: 818-990-2120.

Sue M. Bendavid and Tal Burnovski Yeyni are  Employer Defense Attorneys at our Firm. 

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